Lucia LinaresOLD

Contact: ljl35@cam.ac.uk

 

CV

PhD Candidate History    October 2015 – Present

Darwin College, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England

Dissertation – German Politics and the ‘Jewish Question’, 1914-1919

 

MPhil in International Relations and Politics (Distinction)    October 2015 – July 2015

Lucy Cavendish College, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England

Dissertation – Violence Within Peace: The Institutional Culture of Sexual

Exploitation and Abuse in United Nations Peacekeeping Operations

 

BA (Honours) History and Politics (First Class)    October 2010 – July 2013

Langwith College, University of York, York, England

Dissertation – Freedom Fighters: Austrian Women of Jewish Descent and the Spanish Civil War

 

International Baccalaureate (Diploma: 43 out of 45 points)    January 2000 – May 2010

Vienna International School, Vienna, Austria

 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS

 

Fund for Women Graduates, FfWG, BFWG, United Kingdom    2017 – 2018

 

Simon-Dubnow Fellowship, Simon-Dubnow Institute, Leipzig    2017

 

Graduate Archive Fund, History Department, University of Cambridge    2017

 

Leo Baeck Fellow    2016 – 2017

Leo Baeck Institute, London and Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes, Bonn

 

 

Excellence Award, Kusuma Trust, Gibraltar    2016 – 2018

Awarded for excellence in academic and extra-curricular activities

 

Kate Bertram Award, Lucy Cavendish College, University of Cambridge    2016

Awarded for First Class results in MPhil in International Relations and Politics

 

PhD Tuition Fees Scholarship, Department of Education    2015 – 2018

HM Government of Gibraltar

 

CONFERENCES AND WORKSHOPS

 

‘Translation in Multi-language research’    September 2017

Alma College, Tel Aviv Israel (organiser)

Financed by Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes

 

Leo Baeck Fellowship Programme Workshop in Freudental (paper)    August 2017

Organised by Leo Baeck Institute and Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes

 

‘Jews, Liberalism, Anti-Semitism: The Dialectics of Inclusion, 1750-1950’    January – March 2017

Hilary Term Visiting Scholar at the Oxford Centre of Hebrew and Jewish Studies

Attended seminar in Advanced Jewish Studies and International Conference (13-14 March)

 

PhD Colloquium on Modern European Jewish History (paper)    November 2016

Organised by Leo Baeck Institute London

 

Leo Baeck Fellowship Programme Workshop in Brighton (paper)    October 2016

Organised by Leo Baeck Institute London and Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes

 

Women’s Lunch History of Political Thought Workshop (paper)    March 2016

St John’s College, University of Cambridge, England

 

German Politics and the ‘Jewish Question’, 1914-1919

The First World War confronted German politicians with a range of unprecedented, vital
questions in the spheres of domestic as well as foreign policy. As the fortunes of war shifted,
so did borders, populations and national allegiances. In a period of acute and almost constant
political crisis, the German government faced issues concerning citizenship, minority rights,
religious identity, nationhood and statehood. My dissertation analyses these issues through
the prism of the so-called ‘Jewish Question’. The Jewish Question, I contend, casts important
new light on Germany’s difficult path towards a new democratic and pluralistic constitution
in 1919. Jewish questions revealed the paradoxes of German state-building and the difficulties
of breaking down older forms of corporate identity for the sake of national-cultural
homogeneity. My principal aim in this dissertation is to offer a novel interpretation of the
role that the ‘problem’ of German Jewry played in the political debates and decisions that
paved the way for the Weimar Republic. The relevant historiography still tends to read the
Jewish Question with hindsight, that is, in the context of the Holocaust and from a social or
cultural historical perspective. While it does not ignore the short- and long-term effects the
Jewish Question had on the rise of German antisemitism, my dissertation stresses its
contingency and ambivalence. It offers the first sustained examination of the ways in which
questions about German-Jewish citizenship and religious as well as national identity shaped
the politics of the last Imperial government and influenced the processes of
parliamentarisation and democratisation in the final years of the war. The Jewish Question, I
argue, affords revealing new perspectives on the difficult birth of the Weimar Republic.