Lucia Linares

Contact: llinares2105@gmail.com

 

CV:

PhD Candidate History                                                                                                         October 2015-Present

Darwin College, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England

Dissertation – German Political Thought and the ‘Jewish Question’, 1916-1926

 

MPhil in International Relations and Politics (Distinction)                                             October 2015-July 2015

Lucy Cavendish College, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England

Dissertation – Violence Within Peace: The Institutional Culture of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse in United Nations Peacekeeping Operations

 

BA (Honours) History and Politics (First Class)                                                               October 2010-July 2013

Langwith College, University of York, York, England

Dissertation – Freedom Fighters: Austrian Women of Jewish Descent and the Spanish Civil War

 

International Baccalaureate (Diploma: 43 out of 45 points)                                              January 2000-May 2010

Vienna International School, Vienna, Austria

 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS

 

Fund for Women Graduates, FfWG, BFWG, United Kingdom                                                              2017-2018

 

Simon-Dubnow Fellowship, Simon-Dubnow Institute, Leipzig                                                                         2017

 

Graduate Archive Fund, History Department, University of Cambridge                                                           2017

 

Leo Baeck Fellow, Leo Baeck Institute, London and                                                                                    2016-2017

Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes, Bonn

 

Excellence Award, Kusuma Trust, Gibraltar                                                                                             2016-2018

Awarded for excellence in academic and extra-curricular activities

 

Kate Bertram Award, Lucy Cavendish College, University of Cambridge                                                            2016

Awarded for First Class results in MPhil in International Relations and Politics

 

PhD Tuition Fees Scholarship, Department of Education                                                                      2015-2018

HM Government of Gibraltar

 

CONFERENCES AND WORKSHOPS

 

‘Translation in Multi-language research’, Alma College, Tel Aviv Israel (organiser)                    September 2017

Financed by Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes

 

Leo Baeck Fellowship Programme Workshop in Freudental (paper)                                                 August 2017

Organised by Leo Baeck Institute and Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes

 

‘Jews, Liberalism, Anti-Semitism: The Dialectics of Inclusion, 1750-1950’                          January-March 2017

Hilary Term Visiting Scholar at the Oxford Centre of Hebrew and Jewish Studies

Attended seminar in Advanced Jewish Studies and International Conference (13-14 March)

 

PhD Colloquium on Modern European Jewish History (paper)                                                    November 2016

Organised by Leo Baeck Institute, Queen Mary University of London, England

 

Leo Baeck Fellowship Programme Workshop in Brighton (paper)                                                   October 2016

Organised by Leo Baeck Institute London and Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes

 

Women’s Lunch History of Political Thought Workshop (paper)                                                      March 2016

St John’s College, University of Cambridge, England

 

German Political Thought and ‘Jewish Questions’, 1916 – 1926

Lucia’s project identifies a series of key moments in Reichstag debates and public political discourse when ‘Jewish Questions’ were brought to the fore. Tracing these events from 1916 to 1926, it investigates the impact of these ‘Jewish Questions’ on political-theoretical discussions on the meaning of the modern state by German Gentiles and German Jews. By critically re-examining these crucial debates this research will question whether and if so, how, the notion of a so-called ‘Jewish Question’ – understood to denote concerns of emancipation, citizenship and minority rights as well as the concept of nationhood and statehood – influenced the understanding of political concepts designed to strengthen, and yet served to undermine, the first German democratic Republic. It will consider the ways in which German political thought in the years preceding the new Republic provided a vocabulary for discussing political concepts associated with the so-called ‘Jewish Question’ as well as a forum in which ‘Jewish Questions’ were re-conceptualised. In doing so, this dissertation explores why the attempt to devise a legal and constitutional framework for a pluralistic society then predicated a discourse about exceptionalism and homogeneity, which, in turn, undermined Weimar’s liberal legal framework.