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LBI Year Book Essay Prize Winners

We are pleased to announce that the winner of the 2024 Leo Baeck Institute Year Book Essay Prize is Matthew Johnson for his article Off-Translation: Bertha Pappenheim’s Yiddish-German. The article will be published early, in our 2023 volume of the Leo Baeck Institute Year Book.

We are pleased to announce that the winner of the 2023 Leo Baeck Institute Year Book Essay Prize is Sam Shonkoff for his article Gender in Martin Buber’s Hasidic Tales. The article will be published in the 2023 volume of the Leo Baeck Institute Year Book

Professor Sam Shonkoff is the Taube Family Assistant Professor of Jewish Studies at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California, and his research interests include Jewish thought and theology.

Congratulations to Stefan Boberg

The Leo Baeck Institute London is pleased to announce the winner of the 2022 Leo Baeck Institute Year Book Essay Prize in German-Jewish Studies for his article Implementing the Reichsbürgergesetz: Registration, Statistics, and the Deportations of German Jews, published in the 2022 Leo Baeck Institute Year Book.

Congratulations to Susanne Korbel

The Leo Baeck Institute London is pleased to announce the winner of the 2021 Leo Baeck Institute Year Book Essay Prize in German-Jewish Studies for her article Spaces of Gendered Jewish and Non-Jewish Encounters: Bed Lodgers, Domestic Workers, and Sex Workers in Vienna, 1900–1930, featured in the 2021 Leo Baeck Institute Year Book

Congratulations to Dr Daniel Herskowitz

The Leo Baeck Institute London is pleased to announce the winner of the 2020 Leo Baeck Institute Year Book Essay Prize in German-Jewish Studies for his article "Between Exclusion and Intersection: Heidegger’s Philosophy and Jewish Volkism", featured in the 2020 Leo Baeck Institute Year Book.

Dr Daniel Herskowitz's research interests include Modern and Medieval Jewish Thought, and Jewish-Christian relations.

Congratulations to Adi Armon

The Leo Baeck Institute London is pleased to announce the winner of the 2017 Leo Baeck Institute Year Book Essay Prize in German-Jewish Studies for his article The Parochialism of Intellectual History: The Case of Günther Anders, featured in the 2018 Leo Baeck Institute Year Book.

Congratulations to Joseph Malherek

The Leo Baeck Institute London is pleased to announce the winner of the 2016 Leo Baeck Institute Year Book Essay Prize in German-Jewish Studies for his article Victor Gruen’s Retail Therapy: Exiled Jewish Communities and the Invention of the American Shopping Mall as a Post-War Ideal, featured in the 2016 Leo Baeck Institute Year Book.

This year’s Leo Baeck essay prize for recent PhDs in German-Jewish studies goes to Nick Block for his essay On Nathan Birnbaum’s Messianism and Translating the Jewish Other.

The article was published in the 2015 volume of the Leo Baeck Institute Year Book

This year’s Leo Baeck essay prize for recent PhDs in German-Jewish studies goes to Susanne Hillman for her piece ‘ “A Few Human Beings Walking Hand in Hand” ’. Exposing Margarete Susman’s key role in the emerging Jewish-Christian dialogue in Zurich, the article examines the as yet unpublished correspondence of the prominent Weimar literary critic and philosopher with the former pastor and social activist Leonhard Ragaz, which sought to give meaning to Christian and Jewish destinies on the eve of the Shoah.


 

Verena Hutter’s ‘Identity Politics and the Jewish Body in Edgar Hilsenrath’s The Nazi and the Barber’ is this year’s winner of the Leo Baeck Essay Prize for young researchers in the field of German-Jewish Studies. Examining the role of physical transgression in Hilsenrath’s novel, Hutter argues that The Nazi and the Barber self-consciously conjures up a world in which lies, hatred, and violence are blissfully perpetuated.

The essay is featured in the 2013 Leo Baeck Institute Year Book.

Rachel Ramsay’s ‘Eine verwandtschaftliche Verbindung’ (A Connection of Kinship)? Jewish-Turkish alliances in Contemporary Jewish Writing in German’ explores Jewish and Turkish connections in recent Jewish-authored fiction written in German.

https://doi.org/10.1093/leobaeck/ybs011 

The LBI Year Book Essay Prize was won by Barry Stiefel’s essay on ‘The Architectural Origins of the Great Early Modern Urban Synagogue’, which appeared in the Leo Baeck Institute Year Book 2011.